Fact Checks ☑️

Fact Checks

This photo of pyramids in Egypt has been doctored to include the Lebanese flag
A photo has been shared repeatedly in posts on Facebook, Twitter and in media reports that claim it shows an image of the Lebanese flag projected onto Egypt’s Giza pyramids. The posts claim the pyramids were lit up with the flag in order to show solidarity with Lebanon after a huge explosion in the port of Beirut in early August 2020. The claim is false; the photo has been doctored to include the Lebanese flag on a photo taken in April 2020.

This 2019 video shows Chinese military expert Zhang Zhaozhong dining in Beijing
A video has been viewed tens of thousands of times on Twitter in August 2020 alongside a claim that it shows Chinese military expert Zhang Zhaozhong dining with his family in the United States during ongoing tensions between the two countries. The claim, however, is false; the video in fact shows Zhang dining in Beijing in 2019.

Hoax circulates online that vaccines have caused deaths in the Philippines
Multiple Facebook and Twitter posts shared thousands of times in August 2020 claim that five people in the Philippine city of Tarlac died after receiving vaccine shots. The claim is false; the Tarlac City government and the Philippine Department of Health said the claim was “fake”; the World Health Organization (WHO) said the polio vaccine that was administered across the Philippines in August 2020 was safe.

Foreign-born parents not an obstacle to Kamala Harris becoming president
Social media posts shared thousands of times claim that Senator Kamala Harris, a leading contender to be Joe Biden’s running mate, could not become president because her parents hailed from abroad. This is false; she was born in the United States, making her constitutionally eligible to be both vice president and president.

Her mother is from India and her father from Jamaica — but Harris was born in Oakland, California.

Trudeau corruption hoax originated on satire site
As Justin Trudeau and his family face public outcry and investigations for awarding WE Charity a Can$912 million contract, a widely-spread hoax claims that the Canadian prime minister bought his mother a luxury car with money from the organization, formerly known as Free The Children. This is false; the story was fabricated by a self-proclaimed satirical website, and propagated by a website pushing pro-conservative content.

These photos show an elephant covered in white ash during a Hindu religious ceremony
Six photos have been shared hundreds of times in multiple Facebook posts alongside a claim they show the “rare sight of a white elephant”. The claim, however, is misleading; the photos show an elephant that was covered in white ash in order to resemble a white elephant that features in Hindu mythology.

This photo actually shows a species of fish that is found in North and Central America
A photo of a dead animal has been shared tens of thousands of times in multiple Facebook and Twitter posts that claim it shows a Sri Lankan owl. The claim is false; the image actually shows a species of fish found only in North and Central America.

Post a Comment

0 Comments