Fact Checks ☑️

Fact Checks

No, this image actually shows a doctored Boston Globe front page
An image which has been shared multiple times on Facebook purports to show a report in US newspaper The Boston Globe ranking Sri Lankans the world's “top foolish voters”. The claim is false; the front page has been doctored from an August 2018 edition of the paper; the original front page actually shows an editorial decrying US President Trump’s attacks on the media.

This photo shows Sri Lankan fruit and vegetables being exported to Oman
An image has been shared thousands of times in multiple posts on Facebook which claim it shows Sri Lankan fruit and vegetables being exported to the US. The claim is misleading; Sri Lankan airport authorities said the image shows a consignment of fruit and vegetables that were exported to Muscat, the capital of Oman.

These photos show two Portuguese churches decorated with the bones of devotees
Two images of walls decorated with bones have been shared thousands of times on Facebook and Twitter alongside a claim it shows a church in Portugal which was built with bones of Andalusian Muslims. The claim is false; the images show two separate chapels in two towns in Portugal which housed the bones of devotees.

Kamala Harris does not oppose gun ownership or the Second Amendment
An article and Facebook post claim Democratic vice presidential candidate Kamala Harris opposes the right to own a gun and has plans with running mate Joe Biden to “dismantle” the Second Amendment to the US Constitution. These claims are false; although Harris supports gun safety laws, she says these can co-exist with the Second Amendment, and she is not against gun ownership.

Tweet, Shared by Trump, Misrepresents Photo as ‘Mail-in Voting’ Protest
A photo taken at a Black Lives Matter protest in June is now being shared on social media, including by President Donald Trump, with the false claim that it shows a recent rally in Seattle to “demand mail-in voting.”

False claim circulates on Facebook that Australians 'will be fined if they discuss COVID-19 conspiracies'
Multiple Facebook posts shared hundreds of times claim that “Aussies will be fined if they are found to be talking about conspiracies to do with [COVID-19]”. The posts included a screenshot of a segment from an Australian breakfast television show as evidence for the claim. But the claim is false; an Australian legal expert said as of August 18, 2020, he was not aware of any legislation that banned discussions of COVID-19 conspiracy theories; the Attorney General's Department also said it was not aware of any legislation banning such discussions; the television show pictured in the posts, Nine Network’s Today Extra, said it had been reporting the results of a viewer poll about conspiracy theorists, rather than a piece of legislation.

New 'Plandemic' film spreads coronavirus conspiracy theory
A film titled “Plandemic: Indoctornation” that is spreading online spins a conspiracy theory that the coronavirus pandemic ravaging countries around the globe was planned. It makes unfounded claims, including that the deadly virus was designed in a lab and global health leaders knew the crisis would occur, and also seeks to stoke fears about vaccines.

No, these videos have circulated online in reports about earlier fires in Egypt and the UAE
Four videos have been shared multiple times on Facebook and Line Messenger alongside a claim that they show a fire caused by an oil pipeline explosion in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) city of Dubai on August 16, 2020. The claim is false; the videos have all separately circulated online before mid-August, in reports about earlier fires in Egypt and the UAE.

Misleading claim circulates online about Philippine Health Department's guidelines for face shields
An image has been shared repeatedly on Facebook and Twitter alongside a claim it shows guidelines issued by the Philippine Department of Health about appropriate face shields to protect from the novel coronavirus. The claim is misleading; the Philippine health authority said it did not issue the image in its guidelines; no official government statement on face shields features the image in the misleading posts.

This video shows an Indian police officer beating a man who allegedly broke coronavirus lockdown restrictions
A video has been viewed tens of thousands of times in multiple posts on Facebook alongside a claim it shows an Indian police officer beating a man with a stick after he waved a flag representing an anti-government party on Independence Day. The claim, however, is misleading; the video has circulated online since at least March 2020 in reports about an Indian police officer beating a man who allegedly violated lockdown restrictions.

False claim circulates on Facebook about Philippine retailer's face shield price guide
An image has been shared repeatedly in multiple Facebook posts that purportedly shows an announcement from a Philippine retailer about the price of face shields in its malls. The purported price guide states face shields would be sold at SM’s malls and markets at 20 pesos (USD$0.40) per piece in accordance with government guidelines. The claim is false; the retailer said the purported announcement was “fake news”; the Philippine government suggested a retail price range of 26-50 pesos for face shields, higher than that listed in the misleading Facebook posts.

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