Fact Checks ☑️
Hong Kong pro-democracy banner doctored on social media to label leader Carrie Lam 'a jerk'
An image has been shared hundreds of times in multiple Facebook and Twitter posts in September 2020 which purports to show a Hong Kong pro-democracy banner labelling the territory's leader Carrie Lam "a jerk". But the image has been doctored from a photo of a banner originally pictured in Hong Kong media in May 2019 which called on Lam to resign.

The president of Sri Lanka’s court of appeal was first appointed to the post in January 2020
A claim that the president of Sri Lanka’s court of appeal, Judge A.H.M.D Nawaz, was appointed to the top post after allowing a lawmaker on death row to attend parliamentary sessions has been shared in multiple Facebook posts. The claim is false: the convicted lawmaker was granted permission to attend parliament in September 2020, over eight months after Nawaz was made president of the court of appeal in January 2020.

This image of Manila Bay has been doctored
An image purporting to show a long, pristine beach has been shared hundreds of times in multiple Facebook posts alongside a claim it shows Manila Bay in the Philippines after a government makeover. The claim is false; the image has been doctored from a photo taken in September 2020 of a small artificial beach that was opened by the government along the harbour in Manila Bay.

This photo has been doctored to include an image of India's first law minister on a UK bus
An image that purports to show a portrait of Dr. Bhimrao Ambedkar, India’s first law minister, and his wife displayed on the side of a bus has been shared thousands of times in multiple posts on Facebook and Twitter. The posts claim the image shows the United States honouring Dr. Ambedkar for his writings that, they claim, helped establish the US economic system. The claim is false; the image has been doctored to superimpose the portrait of the Ambedkars on another photo of a bus in the United Kingdom.

No, this photo shows actor Amitabh Bachchan greeting a former Indian state government chief
A photo has been shared thousands of times in multiple posts on Facebook and Twitter alongside a claim it shows Bollywood actor Amitabh Bachchan greeting organised crime fugitive Dawood Ibrahim. The claim is false: the photo has circulated online since 2010 in reports about Bachchan meeting former Maharashtra Chief Minister Ashok Chavan.

This video shows a 2017 protest in Bangladesh against the treatment of Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar
A video of a large crowd marching through the street has been viewed thousands of times in multiple Facebook posts that claim the footage shows demonstrators in the Indian city of Kolkata chanting Islamic slogans. The claim is false; the video actually shows a protest in Bangladesh against the treatment of Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar in September 2017.

This video shows a student attacking his professor in Equatorial Guinea
A video of two men fighting has been shared on Facebook alongside a claim that it shows Guinean President Alpha Conde violently confronting his chief of staff. This is false; the footage was shot in Equatorial Guinea and shows a student attacking his professor in a university parking lot.

Misleading Facebook post claims Bill Gates is making $200 billion from vaccine
A video viewed thousands of times on Facebook claims that billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates admitted to making $200 billion from his charitable foundation’s investment in vaccines. The claim is misleading; the 26-second clip has been cut from a longer TV interview, where Gates estimated the global social and economic benefits from his foundation’s $10 billion investment. An official at the US think tank that calculated the $200 billion return on investment told AFP Fact Check that the claim was “an incorrect interpretation of the analysis”.

Ginsburg Was Confirmed Years Before the 1996 Election
Facebook posts falsely claim that the late Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was “nominated and confirmed 43 days before an election.” She was nominated and confirmed more than three years before the next presidential election.

Trump Campaign Takes Biden’s ‘Pledge of Allegiance’ Remarks Out of Context
Biden, Sept. 21: Think about what he’s saying. He’s saying, if you live in a state like Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania, states with Democratic governors, you’re not his problem. He has no obligation to you. He’s not responsible for you as president, your family or your well-being. I don’t see the presidency that way. I don’t pledge allegiance to red states of America or blue states of America, I pledge allegiance to the United States of America. One nation, indivisible, under God, for real. I’m running as a proud Democrat, but I’m not going to govern as a Democratic president, I’m going to govern as president.

Trump’s campaign falsely claims Biden botched Pledge of Allegiance
US President Donald Trump’s campaign claimed on social media that Democratic candidate Joe Biden mangled the Pledge of Allegiance, posting a video as evidence. This is false; Biden was not reciting the pledge in the clip, but rather making the point that he would seek to serve both his opponents and supporters if he is elected president.

False Attack on Ginsburg Is Reprised After Her Death
After Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death, social media users reprised a false claim about the late Supreme Court justice — arguing she wanted to “lower the age of consent for sex to 12.” The old falsehood is a distortion of a report she co-authored in the 1970s on sex bias in federal laws.

Trump’s Nobel Nonsense
In recent rallies, President Donald Trump has repeatedly conflated winning a Nobel Peace Prize with being nominated for one, and has wrongly faulted the media for ignoring his nomination after making former President Barack Obama’s nomination in 2009 “the biggest story I’ve ever seen.”

The media attention for Obama came after he won the Nobel Peace Prize. Trump has been nominated, but that’s not the “big thing” he makes it out to be. There are 318 candidates for the Nobel Peace Prize for 2020 — 211 are individuals and 107 organizations.

Any one of thousands of people can nominate someone for the prestigious award. And two people have come forward saying they nominated Trump.

But on its website, the Nobel committee warns not to attach too much importance to a nomination.

“Any person or organization can be nominated by anyone eligible to nominate,” the committee states. The Norwegian Nobel Committee has no input into submissions, though it decides who actually wins the prize. “To simply be nominated is therefore not an endorsement or extended honour to imply affiliation with the Nobel Peace Prize or its related institutions,” the committee states.

Nonetheless, Trump has touted the nomination repeatedly at campaign rallies, on Twitter and in TV ads.

Texas ballot fraud story misrepresented by attorney general before spreading online
US Attorney General Bill Barr said a Texas man committed voter fraud with 1,700 mail-in ballots, a claim repeated more than 30,000 times on Facebook. This is false; Barr’s office said the nation’s top law enforcement officer was inaccurately briefed about the case, and a Dallas investigator said 700 ballots were tied to a failed scheme to try and sell votes to city council candidates.

This video actually shows a skit by a US comedian
A video has been viewed tens of thousands of times in multiple posts on Twitter alongside a claim it shows an international student from Tanzania smashing televisions at a university in China. The claim is false; the video actually shows a skit by a US comedian.

Hoax circulates online that Aung San Suu Kyi plagiarised a historic Russian poem
Facebook posts claim that a hand-written poem by Myanmar State Counselor Aung San Suu Kyi, which fetched $180,000 USD at auction in Yangon early September, was plagiarised from a poem by Vladimir Mayakovsky. The claim is false: Russian literature experts told AFP the poem is “certainly not borrowed from Mayakovsky”.

This image shows the aftermath of a boxing match between Dick Hyland and Ray Campbell in 1913
An image showing two bloodied boxers has been shared hundreds of times on Facebook alongside a claim it shows fighters Andy Bowen and Jack Burke after participating in “the longest boxing fight in history” in 1893. The claim is false; the image in fact shows boxers Dick Hyland and Ray Campbell after a fight in 1913.

This video actually shows a safety training exercise in China
A video has been viewed thousands of times on Twitter alongside a claim it shows a fatal construction accident in China. This claim is false; the video actually shows a mock rescue operation in the Chinese city of Lanzhou in September 2020; Lanzhou officials refuted the claim on Weibo, saying that the video “actually shows a safety drill”.

Fake UK health service graphic promotes coronavirus pandemic denial on social media
A graphic has been shared repeatedly in multiple posts on Instagram and Facebook in September 2020 that purports to show advice published by the UK’s health authority, the National Health System (NHS), stating Covid-19 does not exist. The claim is false; the NHS said it did not issue the graphic; the purported information listed in the graphic directly contradicts current UK health service advice about the coronavirus pandemic.

This image was digitally created using two unrelated photos
An image that appears to show a group of soldiers waving an Indian flag below Mount Kailash, a holy peak in Tibet, has been shared in multiple Facebook and Twitter posts that claim the Indian army has taken a swathe of the mountain range that was previously under China’s control. The claim is false: the image is digitally created using an unrelated photo of Indian soldiers and a generic photo of Mount Kailash.

This video actually shows an incident during Modi’s visit to New York in 2014
A video has been viewed tens of thousands of times in multiple posts on Facebook and Twitter alongside a claim it shows an Indian journalist assaulted after a controversial interview with a Bollywood actress implicated in her former partner’s suicide in August 2020. The claim, however is false: this video shows the journalist being stopped by guards during an event with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi in New York in 2014.

This video shows a tsunami in Japan in 2011
Footage has been viewed hundreds of thousands of times on Facebook, YouTube and TikTok alongside a claim that it shows flash floods in Indonesia's Sukabumi regency. The claim is false; the footage has circulated online since 2011 in a video about a tsunami hitting the city of Natori in Japan’s Miyagi prefecture in March that year.