He will go down in history as a president who worsened the grief and tragedy of the most consequential pandemic in 100 years by being contemptuous of masks and the safety precautions designed by his own administration — a man incapable of empathy, who chose to remain cocooned in his White House bubble at a time when leadership would have mattered. — Maeve Reston, CNN National Political Reporter
He will go down in history as a president who worsened the grief and tragedy of the most consequential pandemic in 100 years by being contemptuous of masks and the safety precautions designed by his own administration — a man incapable of empathy, who chose to remain cocooned in his White House bubble at a time when leadership would have mattered. — Maeve Reston, CNN National Political Reporter
Trump fights for a job that he's not doing as coronavirus rages
Trump ran for president pretending he was the consummate dealmaker, the chief executive who could make things happen with a snap of his fingers. He will go down in history as a president who worsened the grief and tragedy of the most consequential pandemic in 100 years by being contemptuous of masks and the safety precautions designed by his own administration -- a man incapable of empathy, who chose to remain cocooned in his White House bubble at a time when leadership would have mattered.

For weeks now, Trump has spent most of his time plotting how to nullify the results of President-elect Joe Biden's November victory as he has fleeced his supporters to pay for a string of ill-conceived lawsuits that were tossed out of court by some of his own judicial appointees. When those efforts failed, he began looking ahead to January 6 when a joint session of Congress meets to formally count the Electoral College results -- seeing another opportunity to try and thwart the democratic process.


... Perhaps most baffling about Trump's disappearance, he has stayed out of the public eye when he could have taken a victory lap following the US Food and Drug Administration's historic authorization of the first Covid-19 vaccine -- despite his previous insistence that he should get all the credit for the vaccines because of his effort to push the companies developing them harder than they'd ever been pushed before.

But if he emerged to herald the vaccine, he would have also had to acknowledge the suffering afflicting America, both from illness and economic hardship, which he knows will reflect poorly on his legacy. The US now has more than 17 million Covid-19 cases and the daily number of new coronavirus cases in the United States is nearing 250,000. Trump has also lost his primary talking point about how the economy is coming roaring back: Jobless claims released Thursday showed that 885,000 Americans filed for first-time unemployment benefits last week.

... The President, who contracted coronavirus in early October, won't get the vaccine until it's recommended by the White House medical team, a White House official told CNN.

But as the nation plunges deeper into this critical fight against Covid, he continues to be missing in action, content to let the gears of government function without him.