It will be enormously damaging to public trust in the vaccine if President Trump isn't visibly enthusiastic, including getting his shot on national television.  It simply isn't good enough to have Vice President Pence as a proxy. — Lawrence Gostin, an American law professor who specializes in public health law at Georgetown Law
It will be enormously damaging to public trust in the vaccine if President Trump isn't visibly enthusiastic, including getting his shot on national television. It simply isn't good enough to have Vice President Pence as a proxy. — Lawrence Gostin, an American law professor who specializes in public health law at Georgetown Law
Trump explicitly rejected leading the US vaccine drive and is letting Mike Pence and Congressional leaders do it instead
  • President Donald Trump declined to lead efforts to encourage Americans to get vaccinated, The Associated Press reported.
  • The president's aides wanted him to embark on trips thanking essential workers and boosting trust in the vaccine, but he passed.
  • Vice President Mike Pence will instead be the center of attention. He is due to be vaccinated live on TV at 8 a.m. ET on Friday.
  • Trump has indicated he will take the vaccine, but has not set a date or said whether he will do it in public.
Dr. Vinay Gupta, an assistant professor of pulmonary and critical care medicine at the University of Washington, told The Times that Trump is in no danger from the vaccine and there is "no scientific reason not to get vaccinated."

... Lawrence Gostin, a public health professor of at Georgetown Law told the AP: "It will be enormously damaging to public trust in the vaccine if President Trump isn't visibly enthusiastic, including getting his shot on national television."

"It simply isn't good enough to have Vice President Pence as a proxy."