GOP Sen. Josh Hawley's challenge to the election results will force a meaningless vote that's all about putting himself in the spotlight. — John Haltiwanger, Senior Politics Reporter and John L. Dorman, Business Insider
GOP Sen. Josh Hawley's challenge to the election results will force a meaningless vote that's all about putting himself in the spotlight. — John Haltiwanger, Senior Politics Reporter and John L. Dorman, Business Insider
GOP Sen. Josh Hawley's challenge to the election results will force a meaningless vote that's all about putting himself in the spotlight
  • GOP Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri, a staunch ally of President Donald Trump, on Wednesday announced he will object when Congress meets to certify the Electoral College vote on January 6.
  • The move will amount to a short delay in the certification of President-elect Joe Biden's 2020 victory, but will not result in the results being overturned in any state.
  • "I cannot vote to certify the electoral college results on January 6 without raising the fact that some states, particularly Pennsylvania, failed to follow their own state election laws," Hawley said.
  • Hawley, a much-discussed future GOP presidential candidate who is also backing $2,000 stimulus checks for American taxpayers, is likely positioning himself to run as a populist candidate if Trump declines a 2024 bid.
Hawley, who is thought to have ambitions of running for president in 2024, is the first senator to say they will object to certification. He's joining a group of House Republicans, led by Rep Mo Brooks of Alabama, who've already said they would object.

Congress performs the final act in the process of certifying the election results in a joint session ahead of Inauguration Day, per the Constitution. In order for an objection to carry weight during this process, it has to be supported by at least one lawmaker from each chamber. If this occurs, the chambers split to debate for two hours before holding a vote on the matter. For the election results in any given state to be tossed out, both chambers would have to vote in favor of doing so.

Given Democrats will control the House on January 6, there's no way the lower chamber would vote to overturn the results. In short, Hawley's objection is doomed to fail.