People seldom notice that Trump's approach to military policy has always been two-faced. Even as he repeatedly denounced the failure of his predecessors to abandon those endless counterinsurgency wars, he bemoaned their alleged neglect of America's regular armed forces and promised to spend whatever it took to 'restore' their fighting strength. — Michael T. Klare, five-college professor emeritus of peace and world security studies at Hampshire College and a senior visiting fellow at the Arms Control Association
People seldom notice that Trump's approach to military policy has always been two-faced. Even as he repeatedly denounced the failure of his predecessors to abandon those endless counterinsurgency wars, he bemoaned their alleged neglect of America's regular armed forces and promised to spend whatever it took to "restore" their fighting strength. — Michael T. Klare, five-college professor emeritus of peace and world security studies at Hampshire College and a senior visiting fellow at the Arms Control Association
Trump says he wants to bring troops home, but he's really setting the stage for much more violent war
  • President Donald Trump's final weeks in office have been marked by his scramble to end the ongoing US conflicts in the Middle East, which have become known as the "forever wars."
  • But throughout his presidency, Trump has tried to convert the US military from a global counterterror force into one designed to fight an all-out war with Russia or China.
  • That is Trump's true military legacy, and it sets the stage for a potentially cataclysmic war in the future.
In the military realm, Donald Trump will most likely be remembered for his insistence on ending America's involvement in its 21st-century "forever wars" — the fruitless, relentless, mind-crushing military campaigns undertaken by Presidents Bush and Obama in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, and Somalia.

After all, as a candidate, Trump pledged to bring US troops home from those dreaded war zones and, in his last days in office, he's been promising to get at least most of the way to that objective. The president's fixation on this issue (and the opposition of his own generals and other officials on the subject) has generated a fair amount of media coverage and endeared him to his isolationist supporters.

Yet, however newsworthy it may be, this focus on Trump's belated troop withdrawals obscures a far more significant aspect of his military legacy: the conversion of the US military from a global counterterror force into one designed to fight an all-out, cataclysmic, potentially nuclear war with China and/or Russia.

People seldom notice that Trump's approach to military policy has always been two-faced. Even as he repeatedly denounced the failure of his predecessors to abandon those endless counterinsurgency wars, he bemoaned their alleged neglect of America's regular armed forces and promised to spend whatever it took to "restore" their fighting strength.

... The posture he's bequeathing to Joe Biden is almost entirely focused on defeating China and Russia in future "high-end" conflicts waged directly against those two countries — fighting that would undoubtedly involve high-tech conventional weapons on a staggering scale and could easily trigger nuclear war.