No, it's not a damn reality. It's a lie, and it's a lie that people believe because politicians like Cruz have for months made irresponsible statements and pushed conspiracy theories. Just because a group of people bought those lies, does not make them into a reality. — Josh Barro, Senior Editor, Business Insider
No, it's not a damn reality. It's a lie, and it's a lie that people believe because politicians like Cruz have for months made irresponsible statements and pushed conspiracy theories. Just because a group of people bought those lies, does not make them into a reality. — Josh Barro, Senior Editor, Business Insider
I never want to hear again about Trump voters needing to 'feel heard.' They were heard when they voted. They lost.
  • Various Republicans such as Sens. Josh Hawley and Ted Cruz have said it's important to entertain dangerous conspiracy theories about the election in order for Trump supporters to "feel heard."
  • Trump supporters were heard on November 3, when they voted.
  • Just because you didn't get your way doesn't mean you weren't listened to.
  • The GOP's embrace of this pathetic politics-as-therapy, indulging voters' personal "truths" instead of telling them the actual truth, led to the insurrection at the Capitol on Wednesday.
  • Mitt Romney is right. The way you show respect for Trump's voters is by telling them the truth: He lost.
No, it's not a damn reality. It's a lie, and it's a lie that people believe because politicians like Cruz have for months made irresponsible statements and pushed conspiracy theories. Just because a group of people bought those lies, does not make them into a reality.

The right's embrace of relativism and politics-as-therapy is pathetic. What happened to "facts don't care about your feelings"?


As Sen. Mitt Romney later noted — following an hours-long pause due to the president's diehard fans sacking the Capitol in a riot that led to five deaths — a quickie congressional commission to investigate "fraud" like the one proposed by Cruz was never going to make election conspiracists feel "heard" anyway. The real way to show them respect, Romney said, would be to tell them the truth: Trump lost. (Or, as Sen. Pat Toomey put it more succinctly: "A commission? Really?")

Over on the House side, Republicans grew angry when Rep. Conor Lamb pointed out that they had engaged in a dishonest stunt that had led to a woman getting shot dead in the Capitol building. The Republican members purported to be offended, and Rep. Andy Harris, a Maryland Republican, nearly came to blows with Texas Democrat (and former NFL linebacker) Colin Allred.

But Lamb was right. The Republicans who indulged election conspiracies have blood on their hands, and if they want to atone they should start by telling their constituents the truth, instead of treating their lies as "a reality."