Rodney and Ekaterina Baker: I can’t believe I’ve ever seen or heard of such a despicable, disgusting sense of entitlement and lack of a moral compass. — Mike Farnworth, the British Columbia solicitor general
Rodney and Ekaterina Baker: I can’t believe I’ve ever seen or heard of such a despicable, disgusting sense of entitlement and lack of a moral compass. — Mike Farnworth, the British Columbia solicitor general
Wealthy couple chartered a plane to the Yukon, took vaccines doses meant for Indigenous elders, authorities said
Located deep in Canada’s Yukon, the remote community of Beaver Creek is home to only about 100 people, most of them members of the White River First Nation.

So when an unfamiliar couple who claimed to work at a local motel showed up at a mobile clinic to receive coronavirus vaccines, it didn’t take long for locals to become suspicious. Authorities soon found that the couple were actually wealthy Vancouver residents who had chartered a private plane to the isolated outpost so that they could get shots intended to protect vulnerable Indigenous elders.

“I can’t believe I’ve ever seen or heard of such a despicable, disgusting sense of entitlement and lack of a moral compass,” Mike Farnworth, the British Columbia solicitor general, said Monday, according to the Vancouver Sun.

Canadian media outlets have identified the couple as casino executive Rodney Baker, 55, and his wife, Ekaterina Baker, a 32-year-old actress whose recent credits include the 2020 films “Fatman” and “Chick Fight.” Each faces fines totaling the equivalent of about $900 for violating quarantine guidelines. Neither could immediately be reached for comment late Monday, and it was not clear whether they have attorneys.

Investor disclosures show that Baker earned more than $10.6 million in 2019 as CEO and president of the Great Canadian Gaming Corp., which owns more than 20 casinos across Canada and is the subject of a separate money laundering probe. He resigned Sunday after charges were filed. A spokesman said that Great Canadian “has no tolerance for actions that run counter to the company’s objectives and values.”

The White River First Nation, which wants to see stiffer penalties for the couple, said in a statement to The Washington Post that the relatively small fines would be “essentially meaningless” for such wealthy individuals.

“It’s clear to me that because we are a predominantly Indigenous community, that they assumed we were naive,” Chief Angela Demit said.
Read the full article: https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2021/01/26/yukon-vaccine-couple-ekaterina-baker/