The words of a president matter, no matter how good or bad that president is. At best, the words of a president can inspire. At worst, they can incite. — President-elect Joe Biden
The words of a president matter, no matter how good or bad that president is. At best, the words of a president can inspire. At worst, they can incite. — President-elect Joe Biden
Shocking, But Predictable, Violence in Donald Trump’s Final Days
... "The words of a president matter, no matter how good or bad that president is," President-elect Joe Biden said in remarks in Wilmington, Delaware, even as Trump remained silent and off the airwaves. "At best, the words of a president can inspire. At worst, they can incite."

Only after the mayhem and violence had gone on for hours did Trump release a taped video asking people to go home. But even in that brief appearance, he claimed the election was "fraudulent" and said he loved those trying to keep Biden from taking office.

"We don't want anybody hurt," Trump said, without specifically condemning the criminal act of breaking into the Senate chamber.

Trump has been accused of inciting bad behavior before. During the campaign, on the day of the Iowa caucuses, Trump said,"If you see somebody getting ready to throw a tomato, knock the crap out of them, would you? Seriously, OK? Just knock the hell ... I promise you I will pay for the legal fees. I promise, I promise," Trump told ralliers.

At another rally, Trump said of one protester, "I'd like to punch him in the face, I'll tell you."

As president, he praised GOP Rep. Greg Gianforte of Montana for allegedly body-slamming a reporter, saying "any guy who can do a body slam, he is my type!" When protesters took to the streets in horror and anguish after the killing of African-American man George Floyd while in police custody, Trump had a disturbing warning: "when the looting starts, the shooting starts," the president tweeted.

Trump supporters – including some of the Republican lawmakers in lockdown in the Capitol as law enforcement tried to retake control of the heavily-guarded building – have long dismissed Trump's rhetoric as just that: rhetoric, provocative language meant to rile people up. The president, his apologists said, need not be taken literally.

That argument fell apart just two weeks before President-elect Joe Biden is to be sworn in as the 46th president and on the very day that Congress was in the process of counting the Electoral College votes that will make Biden the president.

"This is what you've gotten, guys!" an enraged Sen. Mitt Romney, Republican of Utah, yelled to colleagues as the aggressive protesters stormed the Capitol.