We have to fight like hell to restore the soul of [the Republican Party] and I'm willing to go down doing that because I think when history looks back at this moment, it's not going to be the people that voted to not certify the election that'll be written about in history books. — Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois
We have to fight like hell to restore the soul of [the Republican Party] and I'm willing to go down doing that because I think when history looks back at this moment, it's not going to be the people that voted to not certify the election that'll be written about in history books. — Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois
Republicans are fighting for the 'soul' of the party as they reckon with Trump's remaining influence and the rising profile of Marjorie Taylor Greene
  • Republicans are battling for the "soul" of the GOP while at an ideological crossroads.
  • Many conservatives remain deferential to Trump, while others are trying to move ahead.
  • Cheney faced backlash for voting to impeach Trump, while conspiracy theorist Greene was applauded.
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky has untethered himself from Trump. The pair worked together to install hundreds of conservative judges to the federal bench, but McConnell now reportedly never wants to speak with the former president again.

Then there are the 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump for "incitement of insurrection" for his role in the Capitol riots. That group included Republican Caucus Chair Liz Cheney of Wyoming and Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, who has been vocal about condemning the former president.

On February 3, Cheney survived a caucus vote to retain her leadership position for the impeachment vote, while in the same meeting, Greene was given a standing ovation by roughly half of the GOP caucus.


Kinzinger, who said last week that Greene is "not a Republican," told Insider's Anthony L. Fisher that members will have to steer the party back to its core conservatism.

"We have to fight like hell to restore the soul of [the Republican Party] and I'm willing to go down doing that because I think when history looks back at this moment, it's not going to be the people that voted to not certify the election that'll be written about in history books," he said.

Members on the other side of the Republican equation, however, have a vastly different vision for the party.

... Many GOP members are also thinking about 2024 in the event that Trump decides to run for president again and are loath to aggravate conservative voters who continue to believe that Trump won the 2020 presidential election.

Members like McConnell, Kinzinger, and Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah want to steer the party back to its traditional conservative disposition, but McCarthy and Gaetz's in-your-face brand of conservatism is where many members feel the "soul" of the party should belong.

While Biden is aiming to bridge the political divides throughout the country, the GOP will have to confront their own deep fissures or Trump will continue to dominate the party.
Read the full article: https://www.businessinsider.com/fight-for-soul-republican-party-congress-trump-cheney-mccarthy-greene-2021-2