The divide between the more traditional or establishment wing and the more MAGA wing of the Republican Party is pretty clear on both sides of Capitol Hill.  — Jonathan Krasno, a professor of political science at Binghamton University in New York
The divide between the more traditional or establishment wing and the more MAGA wing of the Republican Party is pretty clear on both sides of Capitol Hill. — Jonathan Krasno, a professor of political science at Binghamton University in New York
The Republican Party schism may end up tearing GOP leadership from the House and Senate apart
  • The GOP is currently reckoning with a rift between traditional Republicans and Trump supporters.
  • However, the Senate seems more willing than the House to distance from the former president.
  • Experts said term lengths, fundraising, and long-term planning are all contributing to the divide.
As the Republican Party moves forward after a tumultuous four years led by President Donald Trump, Congressional GOP leadership seems to be tearing apart.

Experts told Insider that most Republican lawmakers are still trying to assess what role Trump will have in the party and how much sway he continues to have with voters, but each chamber seems to be handling the uncertainty differently.

Last week, freshman GOP Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, an avid Trump supporter, received a slew of criticism over past expressions of support for political violence and conspiracy theories. However, the response from Republican leadership in each chamber was notably different.

... "The divide between the more traditional or establishment wing and the more MAGA wing of the Republican Party is pretty clear on both sides of Capitol Hill," Jonathan Krasno, a professor of political science at Binghamton University in New York, told Insider.

But, he said, a few key factors "have deepened the apparent disparity between the Senate and House."

First, Krasno noted, senators represent whole states, which means they likely have a much more diverse base of constituents than members of the House, who represent single districts within their states.

"There are probably Republican House members from Kentucky who would find it suicidal to criticize Marjorie Taylor Greene as directly as McConnell has and others who wouldn't be hurt as much," Krasno said.

McConnell and other senators may feel like they can openly criticize Greene or other Trump loyalists without experiencing severe electoral consequences. This difference is also enhanced by the fact that senators serve six-year terms, rather than representatives' two-year terms, so they may be less likely to have a single comment or decision come back to haunt them.
Read the full article: https://www.businessinsider.com/republican-party-schism-tear-gop-house-and-senate-leadership-apart-2021-2