War doesn't even compare to this. — Grover Nicodemus Street, Traveling nurse and military veteran who served in Iraq and Afghanistan
War doesn't even compare to this. — Grover Nicodemus Street, Traveling nurse and military veteran who served in Iraq and Afghanistan
'War Doesn't Even Compare': A Year In The Life Of A Traveling Nurse
One year ago, Grover Nicodemus Street treated his first case of coronavirus.

Since then, the traveling nurse — a military veteran who served in Iraq and Afghanistan — estimates that he's seen 3,000 people die as a result of the disease.

"What I have seen throughout the year, I would rather die, any other way of dying, than dying with coronavirus. It's a sad way to go," Street says in an interview with All Things Considered. "Your family is not there to hold your hand. The last person that a patient would see is my ugly mug.

"War doesn't even compare to this."


Street is one of the tens of thousands of traveling nurses chasing the country's coronavirus hot spots — from New Jersey to New York to Florida to California — deployed in the battle against a pandemic that has claimed more than half a million lives in the United States in the past year alone.

... The demand for nurses and other medical staff remains high around the country.

The American Association of Colleges of Nurses says that several factors are contributing to the shortage in nurses, including insufficient enrollment and faculty at nursing schools to meet the demand, a significant number of nurses reaching retirement age, and high stress levels that are driving nurses to leave the profession.

And on top of that, health care workers are also falling ill and dying from the virus.

... "I've seen lots of nurses and health care workers quit because they can't handle it," Street says. "If people quit, who's going to take care of all the sick people that come into the hospital?"
Read the full article: https://www.npr.org/2021/03/08/974835141/a-year-in-the-life-of-a-traveling-nurse