New Jersey residents Joseph Cicchetti, 58, and Shirley Limburg, 59, turned their black Fiat hatchback into 'Joe's Covee Car' to give free rides to neighbors unable to get to coronavirus vaccine appointments. — Andrea Salcedo, The Washington Post Morning Mix Reporter
New Jersey residents Joseph Cicchetti, 58, and Shirley Limburg, 59, turned their black Fiat hatchback into 'Joe's Covee Car' to give free rides to neighbors unable to get to coronavirus vaccine appointments. — Andrea Salcedo, The Washington Post Morning Mix Reporter
Their neighbors couldn’t get to vaccine sites. So they created ‘Joe’s Covee Car’ and offered free rides.
In the past two weeks, Cicchetti and his partner, Shirley Limburg, 59, have given at least a dozen rides to residents unable to get to appointments on their own. The service, which launched at the beginning of the month and was first reported by NJ.com, is free and mainly funded by the couple, Cicchetti and Limburg told The Washington Post.

Their motto is simple: “Help stop covid-19. One ride, one shot at a time.”

“Any one person who gets vaccinated and has immunity and doesn’t spread it, that’s a lot of lives saved,” Limburg told The Post.

The retired couple is part of a network of informal volunteers across the nation who have stepped in to help strangers secure vaccines amid a rollout process that has, at times, been bumpy, competitive and confusing.

... Once the couple was fully vaccinated earlier this month, they took “Joe’s Covee Car” to the streets. Anyone who lives in their county or a neighboring one can contact them via Facebook, phone or email. “As long as one of us is available, we will pick them up,” Limburg said.

To keep everyone safe, they only allow one passenger, require masks and check temperatures. They have received calls from all over the state and had to turn down some requests because the riders live too far away. But Cicchetti said many callers have more general questions, like whether the vaccine is safe.

“That’s really a big question. I cannot tell you how many times a day the question comes up,” he said.

For, Limburg, who was left impaired of hearing in one ear after contracting mumps when she was a child before a vaccine was available, vaccine hesitancy pushes her to keep the volunteer services running.

The couple is already in conversation to expand the service to other parts of the state with the help of drivers who are fully vaccinated, have a clean driving record and meet all coronavirus safety guidelines, they said. Prompted by requests to donate to the cause, the couple has also created a Facebook page to cover some expenses.

“We are not rich people by far,” Cicchetti said. “We are doing something that makes a difference. Yeah, money is important, but people’s lives are really important. If we can do something like this on a very limited budget, anyone can do it.”
Read the full article: https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2021/04/19/newjersey-covee-car-vaccines-rides/