The governor does have a habit of picking the most positive numbers and ignoring the bad numbers. He hand-selects data to fit a narrative rather than acknowledge the reality for people. — Florida state Rep. Anna Eskamani
The governor does have a habit of picking the most positive numbers and ignoring the bad numbers. He hand-selects data to fit a narrative rather than acknowledge the reality for people. — Florida state Rep. Anna Eskamani
Extreme policies, average statistics raise questions around Florida's Covid-19 data
"If you had done this analysis in any state in the United States, you would have found a difference," between total excess deaths and total Covid-19 deaths, Jason Salemi, an epidemiologist who publishes his own dashboard of Florida Covid-19 data, told CNN.

"I could be fooled at the end of day, but nothing stands out to me in the publicly available information I have that Florida is an anomaly."

Mortality data collected by the CDC is a highly standardized process that has been refined over a century, Bob Anderson, chief mortality statistician for the CDC, told CNN.

"It's not a new system that arrived with the virus," he said. The CDC codes each death according to an international classification standard, based on information provided on each death certificate.

"Some states are more timely than others in reporting death certificates, but that's the only difference."


... This isn't the first time Florida's official Covid-19 data has faced scrutiny.

... In October, Florida Surgeon General Scott Rivkees announced that the state health department would perform additional reviews of all deaths. A recent review of deaths reported to the state had found that many had occurred more than a month earlier or had a significant lag between the time the individual tested positive for Covid-19 and when they died.

"Fatality data reported to the state consistently presents confusion and warrants a more rigorous review," according to a statement from the Florida Department of Health.

... For Florida state Rep. Anna Eskamani, transparency is a more pressing matter than accuracy.

"In my experience, there have been more occasions of holding back data than misleading data," she told CNN. "The governor does have a habit of picking the most positive numbers and ignoring the bad numbers. He hand-selects data to fit a narrative rather than acknowledge the reality for people."


"Access to even the basic tools to make decisions doesn't seem like a priority for the governor," she said.

An investigation by the South Florida Sun-Sentinel published in December found that the DeSantis administration worked to minimize bad news about the pandemic and spread misinformation, with some officials withholding crucial data about the spread of the virus.

... "It makes it hard to maintain order and trust with the public, and to help reassure people that the government is making decisions with their best interests in mind," she said.
Read the full article: https://www.cnn.com/2021/04/01/health/florida-covid-data/index.html