Climate Change ☀️
Tropical Forest Destruction Accelerated in 2020
There were bright spots, but the total lost acreage increased by 12 percent over all from the year before, according to new research.

More than 10 million acres of tropical forest were destroyed last year, an increase of 12 percent from 2019.

The loss added more than two and a half billion metric tons of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, about twice as much as is spewed into the air by cars in the U.S. every year, according to the World Resources Institute. Brazil once again led the world in the destruction of forests, by a wide margin.

The decline of primary old-growth tropical forest, which plays a critical role in keeping carbon out of the atmosphere and in maintaining biodiversity, came despite the global economic downturn caused by the pandemic, which reduced demand for some commodities that have spurred deforestation in the past.
Read the full article: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/31/climate/deforestation-amazon-brazil.html

Floating gardens as a way to keep farming despite climate change
Bangladesh's floating gardens, built to grow food during flood seasons, could offer a sustainable solution for parts of the world prone to flooding because of climate change, a new study has found.

The study, published recently in the Journal of Agriculture, Food and Environment, suggests that floating gardens might not only help reduce food insecurity, but could also provide income for rural households in flood-prone parts of Bangladesh.

"We are focused here on adaptive change for people who are victims of climate change, but who did not cause climate change," said Craig Jenkins, a co-author of the study and academy professor emeritus of sociology at The Ohio State University. "There's no ambiguity about it: Bangladesh didn't cause the carbon problem, and yet it is already experiencing the effects of climate change."
Read the full article: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/03/210331085648.htm

Carbon-neutral 'biofuel' from lakes
Lakes store huge amounts of methane. In a new study, environmental scientists offer suggestions for how it can be extracted and used as an energy source in the form of methanol.

Discussion about the current climate crisis usually focuses on carbon dioxide (CO2). The greenhouse gas methane is less well known, but although it is much rarer in the atmosphere, its global warming potential is 80 to 100 times greater per unit.

More than half the methane caused by human activities comes from oil production and agricultural fertilizers. But the gas is also created by the natural decomposition of biomass by microbes, for example in lakes. In their most recent publication, researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland outline the potential and theoretical possibilities for using methane from lakes and other freshwater bodies for sustainable energy production.
Read the full article: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/03/210331103612.htm

Climate change, periodic modification of Earth’s climate brought about as a result of changes in the atmosphere as well as interactions between the atmosphere and various other geologic, chemical, biological, and geographic factors within the Earth system.

Source: Climate change - Evidence for climate change | Britannica
Climate Change is the defining issue of our time and we are at a defining moment. From shifting weather patterns that threaten food production, to rising sea levels that increase the risk of catastrophic flooding, the impacts of climate change are global in scope and unprecedented in scale. Without drastic action today, adapting to these impacts in the future will be more difficult and costly.

Source: Climate Change | United Nations