Climate Change ☀️
Rock glaciers will slow Himalayan ice melt
Some Himalayan glaciers are more resilient to global warming than previously predicted, new research suggests.

Rock glaciers are similar to "true" ice glaciers in that they are mixtures of ice and rock that move downhill by gravity -- but the enhanced insulation provided by surface rock debris means rock glaciers will melt more slowly as temperatures rise.

Rock glaciers have generally been overlooked in studies about the future of Himalayan ice.
Read the full article: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/04/210420092855.htm

Can extreme melt destabilize ice sheets?
Researchers have deciphered a trove of data that shows one season of extreme melt can reduce the Greenland Ice Sheet's capacity to store future meltwater - and increase the likelihood of future melt raising sea levels.

Nearly a decade ago, global news outlets reported vast ice melt in the Arctic as sapphire lakes glimmered across the previously frozen Greenland Ice Sheet, one of the most important contributors to sea-level rise. Now researchers have revealed the long-term impact of that extreme melt.

Using a new approach to ice-penetrating radar data, Stanford University scientists show that this melting left behind a contiguous layer of refrozen ice inside the snowpack, including near the middle of the ice sheet where surface melting is usually minimal. Most importantly, the formation of the melt layer changed the ice sheet's behavior by reducing its ability to store future meltwater.
Read the full article: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/04/210420092858.htm

Oceanographers reveal links between migrating Gulf Stream and warming ocean waters
The Northwest Atlantic Shelf is one of the fastest-changing regions in the global ocean, and is currently experiencing marine heat waves, altered fisheries and a surge in sea level rise along the North American east coast. A new article reveals the causes, potential predictability and historical context for these types of rapid changes.
Read the full article: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/04/210420121440.htm

New catalyst for lower CO2 emissions
Perovskites have so far been used for solar cells, as anode materials or electronic components rather than for their catalytic properties. Now scientists have succeeded in producing a special perovskite that is excellently suited as a catalyst for converting CO2 into other useful substances, such as synthetic fuels. The new perovskite catalyst is very stable and also relatively cheap, so it would be suitable for industrial use.

If the CO2 content of the atmosphere is not to increase any further, carbon dioxide must be converted into something else. However, as CO2 is a very stable molecule, this can only be done with the help of special catalysts. The main problem with such catalysts has so far been their lack of stability: after a certain time, many materials lose their catalytic properties.
Read the full article: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/04/210420121506.htm

Climate change, periodic modification of Earth’s climate brought about as a result of changes in the atmosphere as well as interactions between the atmosphere and various other geologic, chemical, biological, and geographic factors within the Earth system.

Source: Climate change - Evidence for climate change | Britannica
Climate Change is the defining issue of our time and we are at a defining moment. From shifting weather patterns that threaten food production, to rising sea levels that increase the risk of catastrophic flooding, the impacts of climate change are global in scope and unprecedented in scale. Without drastic action today, adapting to these impacts in the future will be more difficult and costly.

Source: Climate Change | United Nations