Let me say that, at this time, we really are in a category five hurricane status with regard to the rest of the world ... In terms of the United States, we’re just at the beginning of this surge, we haven’t even really begun to see it yet. — Michael Osterholm, University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy director
Let me say that, at this time, we really are in a category five hurricane status with regard to the rest of the world ... In terms of the United States, we’re just at the beginning of this surge, we haven’t even really begun to see it yet. — Michael Osterholm, University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy director
These are the two key things that can help curb another Covid-19 surge, Fauci says
The US has hit "category five hurricane status" with the pandemic as the Midwest approaches a fourth wave of cases, Michael Osterholm, University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy director, said Sunday.

"Let me say that, at this time, we really are in a category five hurricane status with regard to the rest of the world," Osterholm said on NBC’s Meet the Press.

"At this point, we will see in the next two weeks the highest number of cases reported globally since the beginning of the pandemic. In terms of the United States, we’re just at the beginning of this surge, we haven’t even really begun to see it yet."


Osterholm pointed to Michigan, which has recorded an alarming rise in infection in recent days. The state reported 8,413 new Covid-19 cases on Saturday, its highest tally since December 7, according to health officials. Michigan also has the second highest number of cases of the more contagious B.1.1.7 variant, behind Florida.

Osterholm said surges of cases usually cycle between US regions, starting in the Upper Midwest and Northeast. These surges then subside, and move to the southern sunbelt states, which then subside in turn, with the case spike returning to the original regions.

Not all experts are convinced -- Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), said on CBS’s Face the Nation Sunday that he didn’t think a true fourth wave was likely.

"I don’t think it’s going to be a true fourth wave,” Gottlieb said. “I think we’ve probably delayed the point at which we can get this behind us for the summer, but we haven’t forestalled that opportunity."

Osterholm’s dire warning comes amid good news for the US vaccine rollout -- the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported a record number of shots over the weekend with more than 4 million doses administered in 24 hours.
Read the full article: https://www.cnn.com/2021/04/04/health/us-coronavirus-sunday/index.html