How on Earth is man's best friend supposed to be socialized and interactive with us if they don't even have the opportunity to put their feet on grass? — Sara Amundson, president of the Humane Society Legislative Fund
How on Earth is man's best friend supposed to be socialized and interactive with us if they don't even have the opportunity to put their feet on grass? — Sara Amundson, president of the Humane Society Legislative Fund
Puppy protection: A new bill would require breeders to quit stacking caged dogs on top of each other
  • The Puppy Protection Action would establish new requirements for dog breeders.
  • It calls for puppies to be given room to stand up in their cages and time to socialize with humans.
  • The American Kennel Club has opposed similar measures, saying they impose "arbitrary requirements."
One upside to the pandemic for many this past year was adding a new, four-legged member to their home. People love their dogs, and dogs love them. But new legislation addresses some practices seen as inhumane to pups waiting for a home.

The Puppy Protection Act, introduced this week by a dozen Democrats in the US Senate, aims to improve the conditions in which so many animals are produced: in so-called puppy mills, where caged dogs, one on top of the other, are often deprived of socialization, fresh air, and good hygiene.

Sen. Dick Durbin, a member of Democratic leadership from Illinois, said Tuesday his goal is to protect such animals "from neglectful breeders who have evaded proper oversight and inspection in the past."

There are at least 10,000 puppy mills in the United States, with over 213,000 dogs kept solely to breed, according to the Humane Society. On average, each mother produces about nine babies a year, coming out to more than 13 million puppies to be sold annually.

But only about 2,000 commercial breeders are subject to regulation by the US Department of Agriculture. And that regulation — the subject of this bill — allows for conditions that animal rights advocates see as deplorable, such as permitting dogs to be kept in cramped cages, stacked on top of each other, in overcrowded rooms.

"We've seen animals never leave those stacked cages," Sara Amundson, president of the Humane Society Legislative Fund, told Insider. "How on Earth is man's best friend supposed to be socialized and interactive with us if they don't even have the opportunity to put their feet on grass?"

The bill introduced this week would establish new standards for cage sizes and prohibit their stacking; require that dogs over 12 weeks have unrestricted access to an outdoor play area; mandate 30 minutes a day of socialization with humans and other dogs; and ensure veterinary screening prior to each breeding attempt, limiting mothers to two litters every 18 months and six over their lifetime.


Breeders would also have to make reasonable attempts to find a new home for mothers who no longer produce puppies. Currently, many of these dogs are euthanized.
Read the full article: https://www.businessinsider.com/new-bill-would-require-breeders-to-quit-stacking-caged-dogs-2021-4