So we anticipate that in order to really substantially control the disease, we will have to vaccinate around 70% of the population at least, it's so contagious, that we need lots of people protected so that the virus can't find somebody else to infect. — Dr. William Schaffner, Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
So we anticipate that in order to really substantially control the disease, we will have to vaccinate around 70% of the population at least, it's so contagious, that we need lots of people protected so that the virus can't find somebody else to infect. — Dr. William Schaffner, Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
Many Evangelicals say they won't be vaccinated against Covid-19. Some experts say distrust and misinformation have played a role
The anti-Covid vaccine sentiment among Evangelicals is fed by a mixture of distrust in government, ignorance about how vaccines work, misinformation and political identity, some experts say.

"They (Evangelicals) are the group that is the most likely to say that they are not going to take the vaccine," Samuel Perry, a sociology professor at University of Oklahoma who specializes in religion, told CNN. "They have from the beginning exercised or expressed the most resistance to the vaccine."

And they have maintained that stance over and over in surveys in the last six months, according to Perry.

Among Republicans, White Evangelical Christians are more likely than other religious groups to believe in certain conspiracy theories, according to a study by the conservative American Enterprise Institute.

"There is a tendency within White Christian nationalism, to want to believe these kinds of conspiracies, because I think it reinforces this idea of an us versus them," Perry said. "The problem is, the people who are feeding that fear, have an incentive to keep stoking that fear because people keep clicking, and people keep listening."

News and information "silos" are also playing a part in vaccine hesitancy among Evangelicals, who listen to conservative media hosts who question the vaccines or outright denounce them, Perry said.

Fox News' Tucker Carlson, for example, recently questioned whether the vaccines actually work.

... Evangelicals make up about 25% of the US population, according to Pew. And some experts say that 70% of the population needs to get the vaccine to help control Covid-19.

"This is a highly contagious infection," Dr. William Schaffner, professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, previously told CNN. "So we anticipate that in order to really substantially control the disease, we will have to vaccinate around 70% of the population at least, it's so contagious, that we need lots of people protected so that the virus can't find somebody else to infect."
Read the full article: https://www.cnn.com/2021/04/14/us/covid-vaccine-evangelicals/index.html