The virus is still raging across the planet, and we don’t have the vaccines. This is the greatest priority right now. — Achim Steiner, administrator of the United Nations Development Program
The virus is still raging across the planet, and we don’t have the vaccines. This is the greatest priority right now. — Achim Steiner, administrator of the United Nations Development Program
Global economic recovery is leaving poor countries behind
Poor countries’ struggles amid vaccines shortfall threaten greater instability, migration and disease

Even as millions of Americans enjoy a post-pandemic boom, fresh covid-19 outbreaks in the developing world are undermining economic recovery and fueling political unrest.

Sluggish vaccination campaigns stand between the world’s poorest nations and the resumption of normal life, casting a shadow over a global rebound that is otherwise shaping up as the most impressive in 80 years, according to the World Bank.

The United States and other rich nations have promised to deliver 1 billion vaccines to governments in Africa, Asia and Latin America. But 18 months after the pandemic began, there is no agreed plan or timetable for inoculating perhaps half of the people on the planet.


Now, amid the spread of the highly infectious delta variant, and as finance ministers from the Group of 20 prepare to meet next week, the issue is gaining new urgency.

In Africa, which is suffering the world’s fastest-rising covid caseload, less than 1 percent of the adult population has been vaccinated and South Africa, Rwanda and Uganda all have reimposed restrictions on activity. Latin America is reeling as covid deaths soar in Brazil, Argentina and Colombia. And in South Asia, India’s nearly 1.4 billion people will not reach herd immunity until October 2022, says Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

A failure to accelerate vaccinations could allow the virus to mutate into more deadly forms, leaving lasting wounds on dozens of economies, preventing for years a complete restoration of global travel and ultimately threatening Americans’ health. By aggravating societal cleavages, disparities in the pandemic response between rich and poor nations also could spur political instability and unauthorized migration, including along the southern U.S. border, experts warn.

“The virus is still raging across the planet, and we don’t have the vaccines. This is the greatest priority right now,” said Achim Steiner, administrator of the United Nations Development Program. “ … If this economic crisis paralyzes the ability of state institutions to stand up crisis response, organize vaccination supply chains and provide recovery stimulus packages that can help the economies to recover, we will actually see a political crisis on the back of the economic crisis.”
Read the full article: https://www.washingtonpost.com/us-policy/2021/06/29/global-economy-pandemic/