We have these — these talking heads who have gotten the vaccine and are telling other people not to get the vaccine. That kind of stuff is just, it’s ridiculous. It’s dangerous, it’s damaging, and it’s killing people. I mean, it’s literally killing their supporters. And that makes no sense to me. — Republican governor Spencer Cox of Utah
We have these — these talking heads who have gotten the vaccine and are telling other people not to get the vaccine. That kind of stuff is just, it’s ridiculous. It’s dangerous, it’s damaging, and it’s killing people. I mean, it’s literally killing their supporters. And that makes no sense to me. — Republican governor Spencer Cox of Utah
Republican governor says anti-vaccine rhetoric is ‘killing people’ and denounces ‘propaganda’
“We have these — these talking heads who have gotten the vaccine and are telling other people not to get the vaccine,” Gov. Spencer Cox said in response to a reporter’s question about anti-vaccine rhetoric coming in large part from the political right. “That kind of stuff is just, it’s ridiculous. It’s dangerous, it’s damaging, and it’s killing people. I mean, it’s literally killing their supporters. And that makes no sense to me.”

Cox’s sharp words at a news conference came as some lawmakers and other prominent Republicans fan doubts about the coronavirus vaccines or speak about them with outright hostility, framing efforts to promote the shots as unwelcome incursions from big government.

Members of Congress have derided “door-to-door” outreach; a host at the conservative network Newsmax this week declared vaccines “against nature”; and audience members at a conservative conference cheered last weekend when a speaker said the United States missed its immunization goals. Those in counties won by President Biden are more likely to be fully vaccinated than those in counties won by former president Donald Trump, the Kaiser Family Foundation found this month.


Most covid-19 deaths now occur among the unvaccinated, something Cox underscored as true for Utah. Yet recent polling shows that 29 percent of Americans say they are unlikely to get their shots, with most of those people saying they definitely will not. That’s a slight uptick from three months earlier, when 24 percent said they were unlikely to get vaccinated.

Asked about anti-vaccine messages Thursday, Cox said that they are “harmful” and that “it does concern me deeply.” He said he sees the coronavirus vaccines as a key accomplishment of the Trump administration and believes the herculean effort to develop them in less than a year will go down as “one of the greatest achievements of medicine in human history.”

Trump has taken credit for that accomplishment and got vaccinated, although not in public like other leaders such as Biden and former vice president Mike Pence (R).

“I don’t think we can take credit for getting the vaccine and then tell people that there’s something wrong with the vaccine,” Cox said Thursday.

He used the news conference to plead with residents — again — to get their shots. “We know why the cases are going up. We know why hospitalizations are going up. And it’s just because we need more people to get vaccinated.”
Read the full article: https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2021/07/16/utah-cox-vaccine-propaganda/