The Taliban is putting on a good show for the rest of the world because they want us to be talking about a kinder, gentler Taliban. As soon as the cameras are gone, they are going to be the Taliban … as brutal and horrific and evil as they have always been. — Jason Kander, a former Missouri Secretary of State and Army Captain who served in Afghanistan
The Taliban is putting on a good show for the rest of the world because they want us to be talking about a kinder, gentler Taliban. As soon as the cameras are gone, they are going to be the Taliban … as brutal and horrific and evil as they have always been. — Jason Kander, a former Missouri Secretary of State and Army Captain who served in Afghanistan
The moral injury of abandoning Afghan allies
In Afghanistan, thousands of translators, cultural advisers and other Afghan support staff who worked and fought alongside American troops will be left to the mercy of the Taliban if the US doesn’t get them out of the country.

For many Afghan war vets here in the US, it’s a violation of a promise at the core of the military ethos: you don’t leave a brother or sister in arms behind.

... While the Taliban in Kabul promises amnesty for Afghans who worked with Americans, including at aid organizations or news outlets, there are reports of atrocities outside the capital. “The Taliban is putting on a good show for the rest of the world because they want us to be talking about a kinder, gentler Taliban,” says Kander. “As soon as the cameras are gone, they are going to be the Taliban … as brutal and horrific and evil as they have always been.”


... It’s a war they couldn’t win. But even when you lose a war, there are some very important things you can still keep, or at least hope to: your friends who got you through, your values, your word.

The botched exit in Afghanistan could cost veterans that too.
Read the full article: https://www.cnn.com/2021/08/18/politics/home-front-afghanistan-vets-allies/index.html