We’re not seeing outbreaks when people are following the guidelines. When people point out, ‘Look at this outbreak’ in this school or that school, it’s almost exclusively because they’re not wearing masks. — Dr. Yvonne Maldonado, a pediatric infectious-disease specialist at Stanford Medicine and chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases
We’re not seeing outbreaks when people are following the guidelines. When people point out, ‘Look at this outbreak’ in this school or that school, it’s almost exclusively because they’re not wearing masks. — Dr. Yvonne Maldonado, a pediatric infectious-disease specialist at Stanford Medicine and chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases
School Is Starting. Can Children Stay Safe From Covid-19?
Amid an alarming rise in coronavirus cases nationwide, schools in Texas, Arizona and elsewhere have already had to close this month because of outbreaks, heightening fears among parents in California. In one county in the Atlanta suburbs, more than 700 students and employees tested positive for the virus in just the first two weeks of school, my colleagues report.

But experts say that though reopening does increase the risks of transmission, California classrooms will be among the safest in the nation. Here, masks are required and teachers must be vaccinated against the virus.

“We’re not seeing outbreaks when people are following the guidelines,” said Dr. Yvonne Maldonado, a pediatric infectious-disease specialist at Stanford Medicine and chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases. “When people point out, ‘Look at this outbreak’ in this school or that school, it’s almost exclusively because they’re not wearing masks.”


Still, the reopening of schools comes at an unfortunate time. The highly contagious Delta variant is spreading widely in the U.S., and vaccines haven’t been approved for children under 12, leaving them especially vulnerable to infection.

... “The game-changer of Delta has really been this increased transmissibility,” said Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, infectious disease expert at the University of California, Los Angeles Fielding School of Public Health. “So it’s just that more children, more adults are coming down with the disease.” He added that it’s “not really that it’s necessarily that much more severe in children.”
Read the full article: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/16/us/ca-school-covid.html