When a doctor speaks, people pay attention. The title of being a physician lends credibility to what people say to the general public. That’s why it is so important that these doctors don’t spread misinformation. — Dr. Humayun Chaudhry, president of the Federation of State Medical Boards
When a doctor speaks, people pay attention. The title of being a physician lends credibility to what people say to the general public. That’s why it is so important that these doctors don’t spread misinformation. — Dr. Humayun Chaudhry, president of the Federation of State Medical Boards
Calls Grow to Discipline Doctors Spreading Virus Misinformation
A tiny number of doctors have had an outsize influence in spreading false information about Covid-19 and vaccines.

Even as many doctors fight to save the lives of people sick with Covid-19, a tiny number of their medical peers have had an outsize influence at propelling false and misleading information about the virus and vaccines.

Now there is a growing call among medical groups to discipline physicians spreading incorrect information. The Federation of State Medical Boards, which represents the groups that license and discipline doctors, recommended last month that states consider action against doctors who share false medical claims, including suspending or revoking medical licenses. The American Medical Association says spreading misinformation violates the code of ethics that licensed doctors agree to follow.

“When a doctor speaks, people pay attention,” said Dr. Humayun Chaudhry, president of the Federation of State Medical Boards. “The title of being a physician lends credibility to what people say to the general public. That’s why it is so important that these doctors don’t spread misinformation.”


But Dr. Chaudhry said it was impossible to know how many states had opened investigations into doctors spreading misinformation. Such investigations are typically not publicized until a decision is reached, and the process can take many months.
Read the full article: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/27/technology/doctors-virus-misinformation.html