We have to understand that this virus is now endemic. And that we have to be thinking about our long-term strategies for dealing with it as a global phenomenon. — Robert West, a professor emeritus of health psychology at University College London
We have to understand that this virus is now endemic. And that we have to be thinking about our long-term strategies for dealing with it as a global phenomenon. — Robert West, a professor emeritus of health psychology at University College London
World’s Coronavirus Infection Total Passes Staggering Figure: 200 Million
Vaccines have weakened the link between surging cases and serious illness, but in vaccine-deprived parts of the world, the deadly pattern remains.

Two hundred million is an enormous number.

But as the world recorded the 200 millionth detected case of coronavirus infection, that daunting figure — more than the populations of Germany, France and Spain combined — also fails to capture how far the virus has embedded itself within humanity.


While always an imperfect measure of a virus that causes no symptoms in many of the people it infects, with many infections going unreported, case counts have provided a useful tool for much of the pandemic — like a flashing red light in the cockpit of a jetliner warning of imminent danger.

A surge in case numbers has too often been followed by a crush of people crowding emergency rooms. And then, several weeks later, fatality counts have typically spiked. It took more than a year for the pandemic to reach its 100 millionth case, and little more than six months to double that, with the world surpassing the 200 million figure on Wednesday, according to the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University.

The number of those killed by the virus is also staggering.

The official tallies stand at more than 614,000 deaths in the United States, 558,000 in Brazil and 425,00 in India. Mexico has recorded more than 240,000 fatalities, and Peru nearly 200,000. Britain, Colombia, France, Italy and Russia have each recorded well over 100,000 deaths. The global toll as of Wednesday was about 4.25 million — a serious underestimate, experts say, given the discrepancies in the way nations record Covid deaths.

... Despite lockdowns, travel restrictions, mask mandates, business closures, social distancing and radical shifts in individual behaviors, the virus continues to find a way to spread.


... The spread of the virus among the vaccinated is being intensively watched around the world, and much remains unknown. Are there differences in breakthrough infections depending on which vaccine is administered? How long does it take for protection to fade? And, perhaps most importantly, how will a rise in breakthrough infections affect hospitalization rates?

... “We have to understand that this virus is now endemic,” said Robert West, a professor emeritus of health psychology at University College London who is a subcommittee member of SAGE, a scientific body advising Britain’s government on policy. “And that we have to be thinking about our long-term strategies for dealing with it as a global phenomenon.”

“It is now inevitable that we’re going to be looking at thousands, if not tens of thousands, of deaths a year from this virus for the foreseeable future,” Mr. West said, “in the same way that we see deaths from other causes.”
Read the full article: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/04/world/europe/covid-global-cases-200-million.html