Some elected officials are afraid that if they embrace a more diverse America, they will lose their power. Those same people are willing to weaponize the new Census data to gerrymander the vote and rig the system against Black and Brown Americans. — Martin Luther King III – the eldest son of the revered civil rights campaigner, and chairman of the Drum Major Institute
Some elected officials are afraid that if they embrace a more diverse America, they will lose their power. Those same people are willing to weaponize the new Census data to gerrymander the vote and rig the system against Black and Brown Americans. — Martin Luther King III – the eldest son of the revered civil rights campaigner, and chairman of the Drum Major Institute

If we don't eliminate the filibuster to pass federal voting protections, we're once again allowing White minority rule to govern this nation. — Stephany Spaulding, spokesperson for Just Democracy, a racial justice coalition
If we don't eliminate the filibuster to pass federal voting protections, we're once again allowing White minority rule to govern this nation. — Stephany Spaulding, spokesperson for Just Democracy, a racial justice coalition

How the 2020 census explains Donald Trump
Years before long-awaited 2020 census data published Thursday showed a dramatic picture of a less-White, more diverse, less rural, more metropolitan nation, Trump built a political apparatus on the idea that America's traditional face was changing.

From his racist "birther" campaign against ex-President Barack Obama to a 2016 campaign launch targeting Mexican immigrants, Trump positioned himself as the spokesman for a racial and social culture he portrayed as under attack.

That continued when he became President, with his equivocation over White supremacist marchers in Charlottesville, Virginia (ironically four years to the day before the publication of the census data), to his support for Confederate monuments that lionized the men who fought to preserve slavery. Even now, his political action committee is called Save America, adding to a sense -- fueled by right-wing media titans like Tucker Carlson of Fox News and activists who demagogue teaching about the history of race in schools -- that the country many White culturally conservative citizens always knew is somehow being stolen by outside usurpers and cosmopolitan elites.

Trump has always been more of a showman than a political scientist. But his often-dastardly political talents are based on an instinctive reading of the political fault lines of a changing, divided nation. The census data explains many of the trends he set out to exploit with his nativist, populist campaigns, which intuited a demographic tipping point at a dynamic moment of change.

But while it adds context to the Trump phenomenon, the census data also suggests that the long-term trends are unfavorable to his strategy of appealing overwhelmingly to a declining base of mostly White, rural Americans.


In that sense, this census represents a milestone in one way of looking at events over the last decade-and-a-half of American politics -- as a clash between multiracial, younger Americans represented by Obama's hope-and-change movement and Trump's own backlash campaigns with a far older, homogeneous demographic. The new data suggests that ultimately, if politics is dictated by demographics, the future belongs to Obama's heirs rather than Trump's, since people of color represented 43% of the US population in 2020, up from 34% in 2010. The non-Hispanic White share of the US population fell to 57% in 2020, down 6 percentage points from the last census in 2010, according to the new findings.

If a party that is more and more appealing to its dwindling White base is not prepared to do more to court a wider range of voters, then it is going to have to find more nefarious methods to stay in power. Making it harder for Democrats, city dwellers and minorities to vote is one way to achieve this end.

Martin Luther King III -- the eldest son of the revered civil rights campaigner, and chairman of the Drum Major Institute -- vowed to thwart efforts by the GOP to prevent the changing appearance of the nation from diluting their own power.

"Some elected officials are afraid that if they embrace a more diverse America, they will lose their power," he said in a statement.

"Those same people are willing to weaponize the new Census data to gerrymander the vote and rig the system against Black and Brown Americans," he said.

The sense that the GOP is seeking to retain power despite its base becoming closer to a permanent minority in the nation is likely to further calls from liberals in the years to come for the abolishment of the Senate filibuster. The chamber's rule that effectively requires a 60-vote supermajority to pass major legislation is being used by Republicans to stall voting rights reform written by Democrats to counter state voter repression laws.

"If we don't eliminate the filibuster to pass federal voting protections, we're once again allowing White minority rule to govern this nation," said Stephany Spaulding, spokesperson for Just Democracy, a racial justice coalition.


That imposes additional pressure on more moderate Democrats like Biden and Sens. Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona, who oppose the abolition of the filibuster.
Read the full article: https://www.cnn.com/2021/08/13/politics/how-the-2020-census-explains-donald-trump/index.html