It's very convenient to say after the fact, 'oh, you know, it was hacked. This is a guy who sells pillows ... I don't know why anybody would want to listen to him as an expert on anything related to elections. — Lisa Brown, Oakland County, a Detroit suburb, county clerk
It's very convenient to say after the fact, 'oh, you know, it was hacked. This is a guy who sells pillows ... I don't know why anybody would want to listen to him as an expert on anything related to elections. — Lisa Brown, Oakland County, a Detroit suburb, county clerk
MyPillow magnate Mike Lindell’s latest election conspiracy theory is his most bizarre yet
Since the presidential election, Christina Jensen says she’s been stopped on the street several times by acquaintances who wanted to share troubling news: hackers from Beijing had switched nearly 24,000 votes for Donald Trump in their rural, GOP-leaning Wisconsin county.

Jensen, the Clark County clerk and a Republican herself, has patiently explained that the local election computer system isn’t connected to the internet – and the county has less than 17,000 registered voters overall.

But she finds herself unable to convince those constituents of the simple fact that the election wasn’t stolen: “They are like, ‘Well, Mike Lindell says this,’” Jensen said.

Lindell, the MyPillow CEO and a close ally of former President Donald Trump, has emerged as one of the most vocal boosters still pushing false claims about the 2020 election. In a series of so-called documentaries, Lindell has advanced an increasingly outlandish theory that foreign hackers broke into the computer systems of election offices like Clark County to switch votes – in what he has described as the “biggest cyber-crime in world history.”

Election officials at more than a dozen counties that Lindell has claimed were hacking targets told CNN that the pillow magnate’s claims are utterly meritless. They noted that their voting machines are not connected to the internet, that the results are confirmed by paper ballots, and in some cases that official audits, recounts, or reviews have verified their vote tallies.


In addition, CNN interviewed nine cybersecurity experts, all of whom said the “proof” Lindell has released so far is nonsense – and that there is zero evidence of any kind of successful hacking of last year’s election results.

... in Oakland County, a Detroit suburb, election officials say they get regular phone calls from people claiming their votes were stolen, even after a canvass and two audits of the paper ballots verified the results.

“It’s very convenient to say after the fact, ‘oh, you know, it was hacked,’” said Lisa Brown, the county clerk. “This is a guy who sells pillows … I don’t know why anybody would want to listen to him as an expert on anything related to elections.”

... Trump has continued his ties to Lindell, speaking via video at a Wisconsin rally headlined by the MyPillow CEO in June.

Lindell has said that after his big reveal this month, he expects the Supreme Court to rule 9-0 in favor of reinstating Trump as president – even though there’s no constitutional mechanism for that to happen.

Experts agree that Lindell’s fanciful claims are fanciful and unsupported – and are eroding trust in our democracy.

“Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence,” said Wallach, the Rice University professor. “This ain’t that.”
Read the full article: https://www.cnn.com/2021/08/05/politics/mike-lindell-mypillow-ceo-election-claims-invs/index.html