Now that you have created a precedent, does that mean that all foreign movie stars will be exempted when they fly to Hong Kong to film movies? If not, can you explain why Nicole [Kidman ] was superior to everyone else? Even though I like her a lot. — Michael Tien, a pro-establishment lawmaker
Now that you have created a precedent, does that mean that all foreign movie stars will be exempted when they fly to Hong Kong to film movies? If not, can you explain why Nicole [Kidman ] was superior to everyone else? Even though I like her a lot. — Michael Tien, a pro-establishment lawmaker
Nicole Kidman Skipped Quarantine in Hong Kong. Residents Were Angry.
When Nicole Kidman flew into Hong Kong to film a television series about wealthy expatriates, residents could not help noticing some of the perks at hand: a private jet, a personal driver and, most important, a pass out of mandatory quarantine.

Some of them saw a case of life imitating art, or the power of celebrity, or at least a public relations misstep amid a pandemic.

But either way, many people in the Chinese territory regarded the Australian actress’s end-run around coronavirus rules — some of the strictest in the world — as a symbol of the unfairness that pervades a city known for its soaring inequalities. On Friday, the rare exemption was a point of debate on the floor of the city’s legislature.

“Now that you have created a precedent, does that mean that all foreign movie stars will be exempted when they fly to Hong Kong to film movies?” Michael Tien, a pro-establishment lawmaker, asked Sophia Chan, the health secretary. “If not, can you explain why Nicole was superior to everyone else? Even though I like her a lot.”


Ms. Kidman went shopping in central Hong Kong two days after she flew in from Sydney, Australia, on a private jet, The South China Morning Post reported. The government later confirmed that she and four crew members had been allowed to bypass a rule that required vaccinated travelers from Australia to quarantine in a hotel for a week. (The time was increased to two weeks on Friday.)

A Hong Kong regulation allows a top city official to grant quarantine exemptions to people whose work is deemed “in the interest” of the city’s economic development. The Commerce and Economic Development Bureau said on Thursday that Ms. Kidman’s exemption allows her to carry out “designated professional work” that is seen as necessary to the local economy.

But in a city where the borders have been closed to nonresidents for much of the pandemic — and where some inbound travelers are still required to quarantine in hotels for three weeks — Ms. Kidman’s exemption has not gone over well.

... Many residents have long complained about Hong Kong’s inequalities, and territory leaders have faced other public backlashes for setting different Covid rules for the rich and the poor.
Read the full article: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/20/world/asia/nicole-kidman-hong-kong.html