The way to talk about the Biden administration and climate is two very stark truths. He has done very little and hasn't even [signed] any major legislation, yet he's already done more than any president when it comes to tackling the climate crisis. — Evan Weber, the political director for youth climate group Sunrise Movement
The way to talk about the Biden administration and climate is two very stark truths. He has done very little and hasn't even [signed] any major legislation, yet he's already done more than any president when it comes to tackling the climate crisis. — Evan Weber, the political director for youth climate group Sunrise Movement

It's now crystal clear that the decisions we make this year are going to decide whether there's a livable planet for [my] kids. — Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut
It's now crystal clear that the decisions we make this year are going to decide whether there's a livable planet for [my] kids. — Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut

As the climate crisis worsens in the US, pressure for action from Biden and Kerry grows
Many of President Joe Biden's climate provisions were either whittled down or stripped out of a $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill the Senate passed on Tuesday, at the same time Biden's climate envoy, John Kerry, is trying to secure climate commitments from other nations in preparation for a major UN conference in November.

Global leaders will meet in Glasgow, Scotland, to commit to reducing greenhouse gas emissions -- but officials say the success of the summit will hinge on what can be achieved in Washington. Democratic lawmakers note that most of the work has yet to be done, and much of it falls to Congress.

"I give [the administration] generally very good marks, but with the huge caveat that most of the heavy lifting is still ahead of us," Democratic Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island told CNN. "Glasgow is still ahead of us, reconciliation is still ahead of us, most of their regulatory work is still ahead of us."

The timeline is consequential for Kerry's work; four years of inaction from the Trump administration made other nations skeptical that the US can keep its word on climate. White House officials say the US must show major progress on Biden's decarbonization goals at Glasgow to regain its international credibility.

The last, best hope for legislative action on climate now falls to a $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation bill, which Congress will start work on later this month.


... In around seven months in office, Biden has appointed a domestic climate czar, Gina McCarthy, canceled the Keystone pipeline permit, greenlit several offshore wind projects that languished under the Trump administration and rolled out executive orders aimed at increasing US electric vehicle sales.

After reentering the US in the Paris climate accord in January, he laid out an aggressive target to attempt to stabilize a rapidly warming climate: cutting US greenhouse gas emissions by 50 to 52% relative to 2005 levels by 2030.

... "The way to talk about the Biden administration and climate is two very stark truths," Evan Weber, the political director for youth climate group Sunrise Movement, told CNN. "He has done very little and hasn't even [signed] any major legislation, yet he's already done more than any president when it comes to tackling the climate crisis."

... The need to act on climate was underscored Monday by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which reported fossil fuel emissions are warming the planet much faster than expected, causing already irreversible impacts. The report lays out why fossil fuel emissions need to be cut quickly to keep global temperatures around 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.

"It's now crystal clear that the decisions we make this year are going to decide whether there's a livable planet for my kids," Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut told CNN.
Read the full article: https://www.cnn.com/2021/08/14/politics/biden-kerry-climate-change/index.html