Large-scale boosting in one rich country would send a signal around the world that boosters are needed everywhere. This will suck many vaccine doses out of the system, and many more people will die because they never even had a chance to get a single dose. — Andrew Pollard, the director of the Oxford Vaccine Group at the University of Oxford, and Seth Berkley, the chief executive of Gavi, a global vaccine alliance
Large-scale boosting in one rich country would send a signal around the world that boosters are needed everywhere. This will suck many vaccine doses out of the system, and many more people will die because they never even had a chance to get a single dose. — Andrew Pollard, the director of the Oxford Vaccine Group at the University of Oxford, and Seth Berkley, the chief executive of Gavi, a global vaccine alliance
The prospect of booster shots is igniting a global health debate.
Some nations, including France, Germany and Israel, have authorized booster shots for older people. Israel said on Friday that it was lowering the age of eligibility for a third dose to 50.

Officials from the World Health Organization argue fiercely that booster programs will further deprive lower-income countries of desperately needed vaccines.

Leaving large swaths of the world unvaccinated, W.H.O. officials say, is wasteful, shortsighted and gives the virus enormous latitude to mutate into potentially more transmissible or virulent variants.


International vaccine distribution has been wildly unequal. Many countries in North America and Europe have at least partially vaccinated more than half of their populations, compared with barely more than 4 percent of Africa’s population, according to the Our World in Data project at Oxford University.

At a briefing this month, the W.H.O.’s director general, Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, called for richer countries to stop giving third doses until the end of September. “We cannot — and we should not — accept countries that have already used most of the global supply of vaccines using even more of it, while the world’s most vulnerable people remain unprotected,” he said.

In an essay in the British newspaper The Guardian on Friday, Andrew Pollard, the director of the Oxford Vaccine Group at the University of Oxford, and Seth Berkley, the chief executive of Gavi, a global vaccine alliance, said that there was not enough evidence yet to enable a decision on boosters.

“Large-scale boosting in one rich country would send a signal around the world that boosters are needed everywhere,” they wrote. “This will suck many vaccine doses out of the system, and many more people will die because they never even had a chance to get a single dose.”
Read the full article: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/16/world/booster-shots-debate.html