Across the country, communities have been devastated by the effects of climate change — but, if we act now, we can ensure that aviation plays a central role in the solution. — Pete Buttigieg, United States Transportation Secretary
Across the country, communities have been devastated by the effects of climate change — but, if we act now, we can ensure that aviation plays a central role in the solution. — Pete Buttigieg, United States Transportation Secretary

We enthusiastically support the approach laid out for our industry by the Biden administration. — Doug Parker, American Airlines Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
We enthusiastically support the approach laid out for our industry by the Biden administration. — Doug Parker, American Airlines Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
F.A.A. awards $100 million in grants to efforts to reduce aviation’s environmental impact.
The Federal Aviation Administration announced more than $100 million in grants on Friday to help make flying more environmentally sustainable and less noisy, the first such awards since 2015 under a decade-old program.

The grants, which are part of the Biden administration’s efforts to combat climate change, will go to some of the world’s largest aviation companies, including Boeing, Pratt & Whitney, Honeywell Aerospace and GE Aviation. The money is designated for projects that reduce greenhouse gas emissions or noise pollution. Recipients must invest at least as much of their money as they receive from the government.

“Across the country, communities have been devastated by the effects of climate change — but, if we act now, we can ensure that aviation plays a central role in the solution,” the transportation secretary, Pete Buttigieg, said in a statement.

The nation’s largest airlines this year pledged to eliminate net carbon emissions by 2050, but it is not clear how they will achieve that goal. Electric airplanes that can carry a few hundred people do not exist and may not be feasible for many years or decades. Some companies, like Boeing, have said replacing or supplementing oil-based jet fuel with alternatives, sometimes made from waste, could help reduce emissions. Airbus is working on developing a hydrogen-powered plane. It’s not clear how viable either approach will be.

... “We enthusiastically support the approach laid out for our industry by the Biden administration,” the chief executive of American Airlines, Doug Parker, said in a statement.


The new grants are the third round of funding under the Continuous Lower Energy, Emissions and Noise program, a public-private partnership that began in 2010. No grants were issued under former President Donald Trump, who has called climate change a “hoax.”
Read the full article: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/10/business/faa-grants-emissions-noise.html