What we must do to tackle pandemics, health inequities, and climate change is the same — global solidarity and action that recognise that, within and across nations our destinies are inextricably linked, just as human health is inextricably linked to the health of the planet. — Seye Abimbola, Editor-in-Chief of BMJ Global Health
What we must do to tackle pandemics, health inequities, and climate change is the same — global solidarity and action that recognise that, within and across nations our destinies are inextricably linked, just as human health is inextricably linked to the health of the planet. — Seye Abimbola, Editor-in-Chief of BMJ Global Health
Over 200 health journals call on world leaders to address 'catastrophic harm to health' from climate change
Over 200 health journals across the world have come together to simultaneously publish an editorial calling on world leaders to take emergency action to limit global temperature increases, halt the destruction of nature, and protect health.

While recent targets to reduce emissions and conserve biodiversity are welcome, they are not enough and are yet to be matched with credible short and longer term plans, it warns.

The editorial is published in leading titles from every continent including The BMJ, The Lancet, the New England Journal of Medicine, the East African Medical Journal, the Chinese Science Bulletin, the National Medical Journal of India, the Medical Journal of Australia, and 50 BMJ specialist journals including BMJ Global Health and Thorax.

Never have so many journals come together to make the same statement, reflecting the severity of the climate change emergency now facing the world.

... For decades, health professionals and health journals have been warning of the severe and growing impacts on health from climate change and the destruction of nature.

The impact on health and survival of extreme temperatures, destructive weather events, and the widespread degradation of essential ecosystems are just some of the impacts that we are seeing more of due to a changing climate.

They disproportionately affect the most vulnerable, including children and the elderly, ethnic minorities, poorer communities and those with underlying health conditions.

... Dr Fiona Godlee, Editor-in-Chief of The BMJ, and one of the co-authors of the editorial, said: "Health professionals have been on the frontline of the covid-19 crisis and they are united in warning that going above 1.5C and allowing the continued destruction of nature will bring the next, far deadlier crisis. Wealthier nations must act faster and do more to support those countries already suffering under higher temperatures. 2021 has to be the year the world changes course -- our health depends on it."

Seye Abimbola, Editor-in-Chief of BMJ Global Health, said: "What we must do to tackle pandemics, health inequities, and climate change is the same - global solidarity and action that recognise that, within and across nations our destinies are inextricably linked, just as human health is inextricably linked to the health of the planet."

Professor Alan Smyth, Joint Editor-in-Chief of Thorax, said: "Global warming affects the future of our planet and right now it is affecting the lung health of all of its inhabitants across all ages, from young to old. This editorial is a call to world leaders at COP26 to take immediate and proportionate action to limit the rise in global temperatures."
Read the full article: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/09/210906091017.htm