Two reasons make getting vaccinated against the flu the wise choice. First, it's been proven year after year that you're in better shape to fight off the flu if you get the vaccine. Second, by getting vaccinated against the flu, you help protect the people around you. — Dr. William Schaffner, medical director of the National Foundation of Infectious Diseases
Two reasons make getting vaccinated against the flu the wise choice. First, it's been proven year after year that you're in better shape to fight off the flu if you get the vaccine. Second, by getting vaccinated against the flu, you help protect the people around you. — Dr. William Schaffner, medical director of the National Foundation of Infectious Diseases
It's Time For A Flu Shot. Here's What You Need To Know
With all the talk about COVID-19 vaccines and boosters, it's easy to forget that there's another respiratory virus poised to strike.

Yes, it's that familiar winter nemesis, the flu. And there are vaccines to help ward it off — but also misinformation and fears circulating. "We've been concerned about vaccine fatigue and that people will be confused about whether or when they need the flu shot, and not very eager to once again roll up their sleeve," says Dr. William Schaffner, medical director of the National Foundation of Infectious Diseases. "Flu is a nasty virus and worth protecting against."

"Two reasons make getting vaccinated against the flu the wise choice," he says. "First, it's been proven year after year that you're in better shape to fight off the flu if you get the vaccine. Second, by getting vaccinated against the flu, you help protect the people around you."

... The CDC says aim to get your flu vaccine by the end of October. By then, cases will have started to mount, and many people will be just a few weeks away from travel for Thanksgiving and Christmas. That said, "getting vaccinated at any time during the flu season will still be beneficial," says Dr. Andrew Pavia, chief of pediatric infectious diseases at the University of Utah Health.

... No vaccine is 100 percent effective. But if you do get the flu, the vaccine is likely to reduce your chance of getting very sick, being hospitalized or dying, Pavia says. Before last year, tens of thousands of people got hospitalized or died from the flu each year, usually people who weren't vaccinated.

... With the pandemic still raging, skipping the flu shot is a much riskier proposition, says Dr. Bernard Camins, an infectious disease physician at the Mount Sinai Health System in New York City. "You could get the flu and need care but find hospitals overwhelmed because of COVID, or get the flu and get COVID. And especially if you are not vaccinated against the coronavirus, [you] run the risk of your immune system being overwhelmed by two viruses at the same time." Getting back-to-back infections could result in more serious illness, since the first infection will have already weakened your lungs, says Dr. Priya Nori, an infectious disease specialist at Albert Einstein College of Medicine.


... "Don't stop the public health measures," says Pavia. Distancing, wearing a mask and washing your hands, especially after coughs and sneezes, can improve the chances that you and others will not get the flu — OR COVID-19.
Read the full article: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2021/09/07/1033756464/flu-shot-covid-booster