Why do so many Republican senators and representatives think they are right and the world’s top scientific academies and scientists are wrong?. I would like to be able to chalk it up to lack of information or misinformation. — Sherwood L. Boehlert, a 12-term moderate Republican congressman from upstate New York
Why do so many Republican senators and representatives think they are right and the world’s top scientific academies and scientists are wrong?. I would like to be able to chalk it up to lack of information or misinformation. — Sherwood L. Boehlert, a 12-term moderate Republican congressman from upstate New York
Sherwood Boehlert, a G.O.P Moderate in the House, Dies at 84
Sherwood L. Boehlert, a 12-term moderate Republican congressman from upstate New York who bucked his party’s right-wing shift by standing firm as an environmentalist, died on Tuesday in a hospice care center in New Hartford, N.Y. He was 84.

The cause was complications of dementia, his wife, Marianne Boehlert, said.

As a member of the House from 1983 to 2007 and chairman of the Science Committee from 2001 to 2006, Mr. Boehlert (pronounced BOE-lert) successfully championed legislation that in one case imposed higher fuel economy standards for vehicles and in another, following the collapse of the World Trade Center in 2001, empowered the federal government to investigate structural failures the way it examines aircraft accidents.

In 1990, he galvanized moderate Republicans in a bipartisan coalition that amended the Clean Air Act to reduce the pollution produced by coal-fueled power plants in the Midwest; the plants’ smoke contributed to acid rain that was fatal to fish in Adirondack lakes.

He later chided global warming skeptics, inviting his fellow Republicans to “open their minds.”

“Why do so many Republican senators and representatives think they are right and the world’s top scientific academies and scientists are wrong?” he wrote in an opinion essay for The Washington Post in 2010. “I would like to be able to chalk it up to lack of information or misinformation.”

For someone whose closest exposure to formal training in science was a high school physics course (he received a C), Mr. Boehlert built a solid reputation in that discipline among congressional colleagues of both parties, as well as among scientists and environmentalists.

National Journal called him the “Green Hornet” for his willingness to challenge fellow Republicans on the environment. Congressional Quarterly listed him among the 50 most effective members of Congress.
Read the full article: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/24/us/sherwood-boehlert-dead.html