This year, what we are seeing is every single indicator where we tracked the impact of climate change on health shows it is going in an upward trend. Things are worsening very rapidly. — Marina Romanello, PhD, research director for The Lancet Countdown
This year, what we are seeing is every single indicator where we tracked the impact of climate change on health shows it is going in an upward trend. Things are worsening very rapidly. — Marina Romanello, PhD, research director for The Lancet Countdown
Climate Change Is a 'Code Red' Health Emergency: Report
The impact of climate change on our health has become a "code red" situation, and international efforts to fight the pandemic may be missing opportunities to help the planet while helping ourselves, according to The Lancet Countdown's sixth annual report.

The report summarizes the conclusions of researchers from 43 academic institutions and UN agencies who examined the relationship between health and climate change across five domains using more than 40 indicators.

"This year, what we are seeing is every single indicator where we tracked the impact of climate change on health shows it is going in an upward trend," said Marina Romanello, PhD, lead author and research director for The Lancet Countdown.

The situation, for the first time, is code red for a healthy future, she said. "Things are worsening very rapidly."

... Is it too late? "No," Romanello said, "but it's starting to get late."


"The new report underscores the tremendous opportunity to improve global health by investing in ambitious policies to reduce climate change and prepare for its impacts," said John Kotcher, PhD, research assistant professor at the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication, Fairfax, Virginia, who was not involved in the report.

... Rapid de-carbonization, according to the report, could prevent most of the 3.3 million deaths attributed to air pollution annually, as well as the 842,000 deaths linked with excess consumption of red meat.
Read the full article: https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/961362