[Scott] Miller began a public campaign promoting ivermectin as a curative for COVID-19, and prescribing it without adequate examination to at least one person, with no reliable clinical studies that establish its efficacy in preventing or treating COVID-19. — Washington Medical Commission
[Scott] Miller began a public campaign promoting ivermectin as a curative for COVID-19, and prescribing it without adequate examination to at least one person, with no reliable clinical studies that establish its efficacy in preventing or treating COVID-19. — Washington Medical Commission
PA Defends Against License Suspension for COVID Treatment
The suspension stemmed from allegations against Scott C. Miller, PA-C, by at least six COVID patients, including some who weren't his patients or whom he never examined and a few who later died from the virus, according to the Washington Medical Commission.

"Miller's treatment of COVID-19 patients fell below the standard of care," the suspension report states. "Miller began a public campaign promoting ivermectin as a curative for COVID-19, and prescribing it without adequate examination to at least one person, with no reliable clinical studies that establish its efficacy in preventing or treating COVID-19."

Miller has spoken publicly about his anti-mask views and his support for ivermectin, according to the commission report. As part of the suspension, he was charged with making "misleading representations regarding the efficacy of non-FDA approved treatment and mask use."


In one case that was cited in the report, a 39-year-old patient contacted the pediatric clinic, and Miller spoke with the patient by phone. The patient reported that he had tested positive for COVID. Miller advised the patient to take supplements, including vitamin D and C, zinc, and melatonin, and he prescribed ivermectin, dexamethasone, and azithromycin. He did not perform an exam, verify the information that the patient had provided, advise the patient regarding interactions, or order follow-up testing, the report states.

Other charges against Miller include harassing hospital staff by making threatening statements about hospitals and doctors who treat COVID-19 patients and misrepresenting his original 2013 license application. He denied on the application that he was being investigated by another licensing board. At the time, the California Physician Assistant Board was investigating him for providing medical care and prescribing without a supervising doctor's authorization and without conducting physical exams, among other charges.
Read the full article: https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/961124