We need them to be vaccinated to protect themselves. It is also really important that we as healthcare personnel get vaccinated to protect our patients. — Arjun Srinivasan, MD, associate director for healthcare-associated infection prevention programs at the CDC
We need them to be vaccinated to protect themselves. It is also really important that we as healthcare personnel get vaccinated to protect our patients. — Arjun Srinivasan, MD, associate director for healthcare-associated infection prevention programs at the CDC
CDC: 30% of Hospital Workers in US Still Unvaccinated
Some 30% of healthcare personnel who worked at the thousands of hospitals in the United States were still not fully vaccinated against COVID-19 as of mid-September, according to a new survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

... The slowdown among hospital workers seems to mirror the same decline as in the general population.

Arjun Srinivasan, MD, associate director for healthcare-associated infection prevention programs at the CDC, said the decline in part may be the result of misinformation.

Healthcare personnel "are not fully immune from vaccine misinformation," he said, adding that such misinformation "is contributing to decreased vaccine uptake among non-healthcare personnel."

"The take-home message is that there is a lot of work to do in healthcare settings in order to get all of our healthcare personnel vaccinated," Srinivasan told Medscape Medical News. "We need them to be vaccinated to protect themselves. It is also really important that we as healthcare personnel get vaccinated to protect our patients."


The analysis shows that workers were more likely to be vaccinated if they worked at a children's hospital (77%), lived in metropolitan counties (71%), or worked in a hospital with lower cumulative admissions of COVID-19 patients, or lower cumulative COVID-19 cases.

The odds of being fully vaccinated were lower if the surrounding community had lower vaccination coverage. Workers in non-metropolitan counties (63.3%) and in rural counties (65.1%) were also less likely to be fully vaccinated, as well as those who were in critical access hospitals (64%) or long-term acute care hospitals (68.8%).

The study authors report that surveys have shown that healthcare personnel who are vaccine-hesitant cited concerns they had about vaccine efficacy, adverse effects, the speed of vaccine development, and lack of full US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval. In addition, many reported low trust in the government.
Read the full article: https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/963287