By 2050, the world's population is projected to reach 10 billion people. There is no way we can feed that amount of people unless we change the way we eat and produce food. — Sara Forbes, University of South Australia (UniSA) dietitian
By 2050, the world's population is projected to reach 10 billion people. There is no way we can feed that amount of people unless we change the way we eat and produce food. — Sara Forbes, University of South Australia (UniSA) dietitian
Save the planet (and your health) by steering clear of sweets and pastries
Need another reason to cut back on sugary foods and drinks, apart from an expanding waistline? They're not helping the environment, contributing to a higher cropland, water scarcity and ecological footprint, according to a new review.

University of South Australia (UniSA) dietitian Sara Forbes, who led a review examining 20 studies on the environmental impacts of food consumption in both countries, says the findings highlight the need for more sustainable dietary choices.

... The researchers assessed 20 articles in their study, published in the past decade, with varying findings. Despite the differences, clear trends emerged.

"Discretionary foods have a higher cropland, water scarcity and Ecological Footprint. Meat also emits greenhouse gases, although its water scarcity footprint is lower compared to dairy products, cereals, grains, fruit and vegetables," Forbes says.

"It is time we better acknowledged the environmental impacts of the type and amount of food we eat, considering the planet as well as our health.

"By 2050, the world's population is projected to reach 10 billion people. There is no way we can feed that amount of people unless we change the way we eat and produce food."


Worldwide, food consumption and production account for one quarter of total global emissions. Half of the world's habitable land is used for agriculture which has led to a 60 per cent biodiversity loss. Furthermore, an estimated two thirds of the world's freshwater is used for irrigation.
Read the full article: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/11/211105103801.htm